Peter Dombrovskis Cameron Blake Franklin River Rafting 
Wolfgang Glowacki Nathan Emery

"When you go out there you don’t get away from it all, you get back to it all. You come home to what’s important. You come home to yourself"
- Peter Dombrovskis

Peter was an Australian photographer, known for his Tasmanian scenes. 

His most famous photograph was Morning Mist, Rock Island Bend, Franklin River, which some commentators believe played a part in the victory for Bob Hawke in the 1983 federal election.

On 28 March 1996, Dombrovskis died of a heart attack while photographing near Mount Hayes in the Western Arthurs mountain range of South West Tasmania.

Here is a selection of “Rock Island Bend” Photos we have been collecting over the years from various Photographers. 

 

tasmaniabehindthescenery:

The Wild Side

Tasmania’s West Coast has developed a reputation as an impregnable enigma. The Franklin-Gordon River system winds deep into the untouched World Heritage Area. One of the best ways to experience nature’s grandeur is by riding the currents along these wild waterways. Franklin River Rafting guide thrill-seekers through this remarkable isolated area on eight or ten day long tours. Flow along with the powerful vitality of the river; drifting from serene moments on gentle currents to exhilarating paces and crashing waters. Camp amongst the ancient temperate rainforest, feasting on freshly prepared meals and on a clear night sleep under a sky pinpricked by countless stars.

For more information visit the Franklin River Rafting website.

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by franklinriverrafting.

Wolfgang Glowacki is one of Tasmania’s most well known and respected wilderness photographers. Through his stunning landscape, macro and black and white photographs, Wolfgang brings the unique beauty of Tasmania to the world. His work is exhibited extensively and appears in print, including books, greeting cards and calendars, and online. Wolfgang’s most recent book publication was ‘Wildness Tasmania’ in 2011, a long-anticipated follow-up to his debut, ‘Artscapes’ (2007). Now, Wolfgang is excited to be bringing you his latest images in a book titled ‘Wild Island - Tasmania’, a true celebration of a special place. This new publication will showcase many of Tasmania’s remote wilderness areas, such as the Tarkine coastline, Franklin River and Western Arthur’s, as well as more well-known locations, including Cradle Mountain and Freycinet Peninsular. Followers and people new to Wolfgang’s work will be moved and amazed by each photo, beautifully displayed in this special hardcover: ‘Wild Island - Tasmania’.

All of Wolfgang’s books are self-published, which, as you can appreciate, requires a lot of effort, time and money. Please help him to promote the amazing beauty of Tasmania in this exciting new book by making a donation to this campaign. If the target is reached, Wolfgang will qualify for Crowbar: Arts Tasmania’s crowd-funding initiative, a generous grant of a further $2,000.

For more details have a look on this site.

http://www.pozible.com/project/184896

Here is a little about Wolfgang’s achievements and small sample of his photographs…  http://wolfgangglowacki.com.au/

The Platypus is found mainly in eastern Australia, including Tasmania and is one of only two mammals that lays eggs instead of giving birth.
Together with the Echidna they are the only Monotremes on the planet.
Did you know that the male platypus has a spur on the hind foot that delivers a venom capable of causing severe pain to humans?

But don’t worry we don’t have any recordings of people being attacked on the River before.

Wild, Wild West
Leave the urban sprawl behind and delve deep into the sometimes challenging and wild Tasmanian landscape. The South West of the state has become world renown for its impenetrable ancient forests, untamed rivers and rewarding treks. 
The picture above shows the view from Frenchmans Cap, one of the tracks that runs through the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park and part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The 1446m high white quartzite dome stretches above the surrounding buttongrass plains, Lake Tahune, glacial valleys and endless rainforest dotted with Huon and King Billy pines. Careful preparation is advised for this strenuous trek.


Go Behind the scenery Tasmania
  • Camera: Olympus E-M5
  • Aperture: f/10
  • Exposure: 1/400th
  • Focal Length: 12mm

Wild, Wild West

Leave the urban sprawl behind and delve deep into the sometimes challenging and wild Tasmanian landscape. The South West of the state has become world renown for its impenetrable ancient forests, untamed rivers and rewarding treks. 

The picture above shows the view from Frenchmans Cap, one of the tracks that runs through the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park and part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The 1446m high white quartzite dome stretches above the surrounding buttongrass plains, Lake Tahune, glacial valleys and endless rainforest dotted with Huon and King Billy pines. Careful preparation is advised for this strenuous trek.

Go Behind the scenery Tasmania

libutron:

Short-beaked echidna 

The Short-beaked echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus (Monotrematae - Tachyglossidae), is the most widely distributed endemic Australian mammal, and echidnas from different geographic areas differ so much in appearance that they have been assigned to several subspecies.

This is the tasmanian subspecies, Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus. They look a lot more cuddly and have a lot more hair than the ones on the Australian mainland that are all spines.

Echidnas lay shell covered eggs that hatch outside the mother’s body, and although they do not have teats, secrete milk through several pores in the belly.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Donovan Wilson | Locality: Tasmania